News & Press,44 - SYMMETRICAL CELEBRATION

News & Press > 44 - SYMMETRICAL CELEBRATION

05 November, 2014

A bright green meteor dazzled the Western Sky over Japan early Monday evening, Nov 3rd while I sat in Narita Airport (Tokyo) waiting for my return flight to Australia. I made it back just in time on Tuesday for the 2014 Melbourne Cup, the famous 'horse race that stops a nation' and gathered at the local pub to watch the event on the big screen with friends. As the horses crossed the finish line, there were only two people in the entire establishment jumping with winning joy. A man next to me and... me! Maybe lucky meteor dust sprinkled our flight path. His name was Terry, a Frenchman who had been living in Australia for 42 years. It was a little whacky that the seemingly only two winners in the pub were squeezed next to each other, so he insisted on showing a text he sent his daughter earlier that day.

     

 MELBOURNE CUP FINISHING ORDER

 1ST PLACE:     #5 PROTECTIONIST

 2ND PLACE:    #4 RED CADEAUX

 3RD PLACE:    #12 WHO SHOT THE BARMAN 

 

 

Taking a trip "Music and Science merge in a world premier orchestral event with Professor Brian Cox and the Queensland Symphony Orchestra. Exclusive to Brisbane"

      

Home from the trip... and won't sleep tonight, I know it. WOW

This "Pale Blue Dot" photo is famous but tonight was my introduction, accompanied by a reading of this Carl Sagan quote: "Look at that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religious idealogies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politican, every "superstar", every "supreme leader", every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there - on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam. 

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. 

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbour life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes, Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for that moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known."

(This is a Nov 19th posting because I've only just read that I share the same birthday as Carl Sagan - Nov 9th. The 'pale blue dot' was posted on Nov 8th.  Close enough to shake and mention.)

NOV 12: extract from a blog in late 2013 "Building an Orchestra"

"One afternoon this year I had the opportunity to sit down with a lecturer at the QLD Conservatorium of Music who specializes in Music Composition, Dr Ralph Hultgren. He wasn't sure why he had an ex-Olympian sitting in his office but I was armed with a mind full of dissection instruments. We took a walk through the composing process and he introduced me to his thesis. Upon listening to notes and instruments in his mind, Dr Hultgren would then place them on a music chart in the computer and with a clever program he could press play to listen. If something didn't sound right, he could press pause, tweek the note where needed and make it right. I commented "Wow, wouldn't that be nice to press pause on someone in your workplace or sporting team who didn't sound right, tune them and the whole group is better." Dr Hultgren replied jokingly "I would be on pause a lot!"

Humanity is a tough orchestra to manage. It would take one very clever conductor to get everyone's attention and inspire them to act  in harmony with the group. Harmony sounds like a soft, easy word but when you're dealing with spectrums, high and low, big and small, old and young and trying to get them to sound great together, it grows intricate and tricky. If we could just get our minds around the possibility that we are all musical - our intensity, frequency levels, wavelengths and pitch of emotions, thoughts, intentions and actions? There is so much to learn from music beyond simply listening to it."

RUSSIAN WARSHIPS NEAR AUSTRALIAN WATERS AHEAD OF THE G20

NOV 17 - Exercising when feeling hurt or angry always pushes me to exhaustion and tears. Something about being out of breath, hunched over and crying - it helps. The quiet and wildly energetic. #SpaceTravel

                   

BEACH WALK, BUSH JOG, DINNER WITH THE OCEAN AND THE DOLPHINS

    

dragonfly on fingertip

 

THERE IS MORE EMOTION THAN MONEY ON THIS PLANET. POWERFUL CURRENCY. 

Sunday sleepy symmetry from these two fluffy masters of subtlety